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Indian climber reaches top of Everest, six years after faking summit attempt

This time there was no humiliating claim of faked photos, no shameful controversy, and no ban from Mount Everest in the majestic Himalayas.
Six years after he was accused of doctoring at what first looked like a successful ascent of the world's tallest mountain, Indian climber Narender Singh Yadav on Friday morning reached the top of Everest's 8849-metres.
Although Yadav maintains there was nothing fake about his 2016 summit, the 26-year-old said he returned to Everest this year to "prove himself".
Indian mountaineer Narender Singh Yadav reached the summit of Everest at 5:02am on May 27, six years after he was accused of faking it.
Indian mountaineer Narender Singh Yadav reached the summit of Everest at 5:02am on May 27, six years after he was accused of faking it. (Twitter)
Days after his ban elapsed, Yadav made it to the summit at 5:02am on May 27, according to AFP.
It took Yadav just six days to summit, much quicker than the average 30-45 it takes most climbers who spend long periods acclimatising to the high altitude at base camp.
Yadav was accompanied by two Sherpas, who took an extensive series of photographs and video so there could be no doubt this time.
In photos posted to Twitter, Yadav is pictured in partial early morning sunlight, standing on a point of the planet so rarefied it is possible to see the curvature of Earth.
Against an epic backdrop of blue and white, Yadav is proudly holding the Indian flag.
"Everest is a dream for all of us but Everest is life for me," Yadav told AFP, after the climb.
"There were a lot of allegations on me... that's why I (had to) prove myself and climb Everest."
Yadav has insisted he was an unwitting victim in 2016.
Yadav claimed it was his expedition leader who digitally altered photos from the climb, which quickly pinged the radar of the global climbing community.
When photos of the climb were posted on social media, other climbers and Sherpas questioned the validity of Yadav's claims.
Since the ban was imposed, Yadav has spoken about his shame of having the Nepal government publicly revoke recognition of his feat.
"People called me a fraud," Yadav told the Kathmandu Post.
"(But) I am happy now.
"I waited for many years to achieve this goal."
Yadav summitted without acclimatising for weeks at base camp.
A long queue of mountain climbers line a path on Mount Everest, in this photograph that made headlines around the world.
A long queue of mountain climbers line a path on Mount Everest, in this photograph that made headlines around the world. (Nimsdai Project Possible via AP)
Birds glide in the Himalayas as Mount Everest is seen from Namche Bajar, Solukhumbu district, in Nepal.
Birds glide in the Himalayas as Mount Everest is seen from Namche Bajar, Solukhumbu district, in Nepal. (AP / Niranjan Shrestha)
According to Nepalese government figures, 560 climbers and guides reached the top of Everest this year in a season that was blessed with good weather.
Yadav is not the first to be accused of faking a successful ascent of Everest.
A century of climbing Mount Everest
Indians Dinesh and Tarakeshwari Rathod were banned from Everest for 10 years in 2016 after they claimed to be India's first couple to conquer the mountain.
Like Yadov, their climb was disputed because of photos which many believed had been digitally altered.
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